Articles Tagged with “long term disability”

The O’Ryan Law Firm has sued Cigna on behalf of a Subaru employee who became disabled, was paid short term disability benefits but then Cigna denied his long term disability benefits.  The client was a Warehouse Associate with Subaru of America for several years.  His job at Subaru as a Warehouse Associate included the following responsibilities:

  • Reading production schedules, customer orders, work orders, shipping orders and requisitions to determine items to be moved, gathered or distributed.
  • Conveying materials and items from receiving or production areas to storage or to other designated areas by hand, hand-truck, or electric hand-truck.

Urinary incontinence is a surprisingly common problem that affects millions of Americans, and is described by the Mayo Clinic [1] as follows:

Urinary incontinence — the loss of bladder control — is a common and often embarrassing problem. The severity ranges from occasionally leaking urine when you cough or sneeze to having an urge to urinate that’s so sudden and strong you don’t get to a toilet in time.

Though it occurs more often as people get older, urinary incontinence isn’t an inevitable consequence of aging. If urinary incontinence affects your daily activities, don’t hesitate to see your doctor. For most people, simple lifestyle changes or medical treatment can ease discomfort or stop urinary incontinence.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention[1], Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) is described as follows:

Chronic fatigue syndrome, or CFS, is a devastating and complex disorder. People with CFS have overwhelming fatigue and a host of other symptoms that are not improved by bed rest and that can get worse after physical activity or mental exertion. They often function at a substantially lower level of activity than they were capable of before they became ill.

Besides severe fatigue, other symptoms include muscle pain, impaired memory or mental concentration, insomnia, and post-exertion malaise lasting more than 24 hours. In some cases, CFS can persist for years.

O’Ryan Law Firm, on behalf of Plaintiff, Denise D., recently filed a lawsuit against The Prudential Insurance Company of America (“Prudential”).   Plaintiff was employed by Advance/Newhouse Partnership, which made her eligible for the Advance/Newhouse Partnership Short Term and Long Term Disability Plans, which were administered and insured by Prudential.

Facts of the Case Against Prudential

Plaintiff was employed by Advance/Newhouse Partnership from 2012 until she became disabled in February 2016 and was unable to work due to lupus, fibromyalgia, migraines, spondylosis and radiculopathy. Plaintiff’s treating physicians provided objective medical proof that the Plaintiff was unable to continue working due to these serious illnesses.  Her physicians also confirmed that she was unable to perform the material duties of her job thus meeting the definition of “Disabled” under the Prudential policy.

It’s never too early or too late to hire an attorney to represent you in your disability case. You do not have to wait to be denied by your insurance company before talking to an attorney. We offer several services that can protect your interests. Here are some examples of how we can help:

  • Assist you with your initial application for Long Term or Short Term Disability benefits.
  • Help manage your monthly Long Term Disability benefits.

O’Ryan Law Firm, on behalf of Plaintiff Dee Ann Miller recently filed a federal lawsuit against The Hartford Life and Accident Insurance Company (“Hartford”) for payment of disability benefits. The Plaintiff was employed as a Senior Collector with Springleaf Finance, Inc., which made her eligible for disability benefits under the Springleaf Finance Disability Plan and Hartford policy who insures the Plan.  In Miller v .The Hartford Life and Accident Insurance Company, the Plaintiff filed a lawsuit to gain the long term disability benefits she was entitled to under the terms of the Hartford policy and promised to her by her former employer.

Facts of the Case

Ms. Miller was employed by Springleaf Finance for over 15 years until she became disabled in 2014 due to the disabling effects of Fibromyalgia, psoriatic arthritis, osteoarthritis, and chronic pain.  Ms. Miller submitted a claim to Hartford and was paid disability benefits by Hartford. from September 2014 to April 2015.  Her condition did not improve and her medical records showed that she continued to actively seek treatment for her multiple medical conditions.  The last report from her rheumatologist showed that she had 18 of 18 tender points.  She also has difficulty grasping with her hands because of her arthritis.

O’Ryan Law Firm, on behalf of Plaintiff Shane C., recently filed a federal lawsuit against The Prudential Insurance Company of America (“Prudential”). The Plaintiff was employed as Senior Vice President Regional Manager with Custard Insurance Adjusters, Inc. which made him eligible for disability benefits under the Custard Insurance Adjusters, Inc. Long Term Disability Plan (the “Plan”).  As a Regional Manager, Shane was required to travel to 9 different offices throughout the Midwest to oversee and supervise these 9 offices.

In Shane C. v. The Prudential Insurance Company of America and Custard Insurance Adjuster, Inc. Long Term Disability Plan, the Plaintiff filed a lawsuit under ERISA to gain the long-term disability benefits he was entitled to under the terms of the Prudential policy.

Facts of the Case Against Prudential

O’Ryan Law Firm, on behalf of Plaintiff, Pamela H., recently filed a federal lawsuit against Life Insurance Company of North America (LINA) (a subsidiary of Cigna). The Plaintiff was employed by Purdue University, which made her eligible for Purdue’s long-term disability plan, which was insured by LINA.

In Pamela H. v. Life Insurance Company of North America, the Plaintiff filed a disability lawsuit to gain the long-term disability benefits she deserved under the terms of the LINA policy.

Facts of the Case Against LINA

Plaintiff was employed by Purdue University from December 2004 until she became disabled on July 6, 2014 and unable to work. This was due to lumbar radiculopathy and rheumatoid arthritis. Plaintiff’s treating physicians provided objective medical proof that the Plaintiff was unable to continue working due to these ailments.

Plaintiff filed an application for long-term disability benefits and LINA denied her claim on November 3, 2014.
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A diagnosis of cancer – even one that is treatable – cannot be taken lightly. Although significant progress has been made in the field of cancer research and treatment, cancer still takes the lives of millions of people worldwide every year. There are over 100 types of cancer and treatment can vary for individuals on a case-by-case basis. Often, cancer and the treatment of cancer (which may include surgery, chemotherapy, and/or radiation) can force individuals to stop working.

Some may assume that a cancer patient who applies for disability benefits will easily be approved for disability benefits. However, this is not always true. It is not enough to prove a diagnosis of cancer and expect to receive disability benefits. Rather, the individual must show that the cancer and/or cancer treatment is causing severe symptoms that would prevent the performance of work and that they meet the applicable definition of “Disability”.

To improve the chances of being approved for disability benefits, the patient should have their doctor clearly document all of their symptoms, including pain, headaches, fatigue, nausea, numbness, dizziness, inability to concentrate, memory problems, difficulty walking or standing, emotional difficulty, and any other symptoms that affect functioning. This means that the patient must maintain treatment for all medical professionals they see, including oncologists, surgeons, family doctors, pain management specialists, and others.

The individual should also carefully track the symptoms they experience after surgery, chemotherapy, or radiation. Each of these forms of treatment may come with severe side effects. For example, chemotherapy may cause peripheral neuropathy. If a chemotherapy patient experiences neuropathy, they should have their doctor carefully document their symptoms of pain and numbness, and also undergo appropriate testing (EMG) to prove that the patient is experiencing neuropathy. Another possible side effect of chemotherapy is “chemo brain”. If an individual experiences chemo brain, they should undergo a mental status examination to document their forgetfulness, trouble concentrating, trouble multi-tasking, taking longer to finish tasks, or other memory problems.

Radiation affects people differently, but it may cause skin changes, tiredness, diarrhea, or trouble eating, among other side effects. Again, it is important to have medical providers document each and every symptom experienced. If a disability claim is missing documentation about each symptom, then it may not accurately depict the severity of the individual’s condition.
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More students than ever are graduating with student loan debt. Tuition has skyrocketed in the last few decades and it is now common for college graduates to owe tens of thousands of dollars by the time they earn their undergraduate diploma. If an individual becomes disabled before they pay back their federal student loan debt, they may face a very difficult situation.

If an individual took out student loans to finance their education, then these loans are currently not dischargable by bankruptcy unless that individual can prove that repaying the loan would cause an “undue hardship“. Proving an “undue hardship” is an extremely high standard to show unless the individual has a severe disability. The U.S. Department of Education’s website provides the reasons for which a student loan may be forgiven, cancelled, or discharged: Department of Education’s website.

Federal student loans may be discharged if the borrower suffers a total and permanent disability. According to the U.S. Department of Education, there are three ways for an individual to prove that they are totally and permanently disabled:

1. If you are a veteran, you can submit documentation from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) showing that the VA has determined that you are unemployable due to a service-connected disability.
2. If you are receiving Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits, you can submit a Social Security Administration (SSA) notice of award for SSDI or SSI benefits stating that your next scheduled disability review will be within five to seven years from the date of your most recent SSA disability determination.
3. You can submit certification from a physician that you are totally and permanently disabled. Your physician must certify that you are unable to engage in any substantial gainful activity by reason of a medically determinable physical or mental impairment that – Can be expected to result in death,
– Has lasted for a continuous period of not less than 60 months, or – Can be expected to last for a continuous period of not less than 60 months.

The Department of Education allows individuals to apply for a “Total and Permanent Disability (TPD) Discharge” for federal loans online at the following website: http://www.disabilitydischarge.com/home/
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