Articles Tagged with “heart attack”

When a person has a medical problem affecting his heart or circulatory system, he may have work restrictions that prevent the ability to continue working. Depending on the severity of the heart condition, working may put a person at risk of suffering a heart attack or other life threatening cardiac event. In these situations, a person with cardiovascular impairments may qualify for short term disability benefits, long term disability benefits, and/or Social Security disability benefits.

Because a heart condition can be life threatening, it is crucial that a person with a cardiovascular problem seek immediate medical attention. When a patient presents with chest pain, palpitations, syncope, or other cardiovascular symptoms, it is common for physicians to order extensive testing. Testing for heart conditions may include echocardiograms (echo), electrocardiogram (ECG), exercise tests, drug-induced stress tests, Holter monitor tests, cardiac catheterization, cardiac computerized tomography (CT) scans, cardiac magnetic resonance imagings (MRI), chest x-rays, and blood tests.

Following the appropriate testing, treatment with a cardiologist is required to document the severity of the heart condition. If a person is required to undergo surgery, then she may have to see a surgeon specializing in heart operations. A cardiologist may only require a patient to follow-up on an annual basis, which means that it is important for the patient to also maintain treatment with her primary care provider and other doctors.

If a person undergoes a cardiovascular event such as a heart attack or surgery, but then is able to return to normal functioning, then he might only be eligible for short term disability benefits. However, if a heart condition requires the person to miss at least three months of work, then he may be eligible for long term disability benefits. To be eligible for Social Security disability benefits, the disability must last or be expected to last 12 months or longer.
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