Articles Tagged with “health insurance”

Maintaining or obtaining health insurance coverage is a common problem for those applying for disability benefits. Many Americans receive health insurance coverage through their employer. When a disability forces the employee to stop working, they are at risk of losing their health insurance coverage unless they timely pay the hefty premiums pursuant to the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA). Unfortunately, not having health insurance can be very problematic for those applying for disability benefits.

If the disabled individual is able to afford the premiums for continued health insurance coverage under COBRA, then it is probably in her best interest to pay the monthly premiums and maintain her current health insurance coverage. However, many individuals are unable to afford the monthly premiums without the regular income from a job. When a disabled person cannot make these required payments, they will be forced to find new health insurance coverage or forego health insurance at all.

First of all, applying for disability benefits without health insurance coverage is challenging. Without health insurance coverage, the individual is usually unable to afford the out-of-pocket expenses required for regular medical treatment. The individual may miss out on important testing, medications, and regular examinations. Of course, if the patient is not seeing their doctor, there will be a lack of current medical records to document the patient’s disability. For both long term disability claims and Social Security disability claims, a lack of ongoing medical treatment can make it much more likely that their disability claim will be denied.

Second, the claimant should do everything in his power to obtain health insurance. This includes looking for private health insurance via the federal health insurance marketplace: https://www.healthcare.gov/ If the individual cannot afford private health insurance options, they should investigate whether they are eligible for their state’s Medicaid program. For Indiana residents, information about applying for Medicaid can be found at the following website: http://member.indianamedicaid.com/apply-for-medicaid.aspx. Even if an Indiana resident is not eligible for Medicaid, they may still be eligible for another state program, such as Care Select, Healthy Indiana Plan, or Hoosier Healthwise. If the individual already receives Social Security disability benefits, then they should eventually be eligible for Medicare, although there is a two year wait to qualify for Medicare.
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When completing an application for life, health or disability insurance coverage, an insurance company will ask a broad array of questions designed to determine whether an individual is a good risk and the type of coverage that should be issued. It is important to carefully complete the application form to make sure that all of the answers are 100% accurate; otherwise, the insurance company may later deny your claim. Unfortunately, many people do not find out that they failed to disclose important information on the insurance application until a claim is submitted. The insurance company then denies the claim contending that the insured made a material misrepresentation in the application because the insured failed to disclose important information such as a previous health condition or by their failure to answer “yes” to questions which were answered “no.” If the misrepresentation is material to the insurer issuing coverage, the insurance company has the right to deny the claim, rescind the policy and refund the premiums that have been paid.

The falsity of any statement in the application for any policy may not bar the right to recovery thereunder unless such false statement materially affected either the acceptance of the risk or the hazard assumed by the insurer. (IC 27-8-5-5(c)). False representations on an insurance application made by an insured concerning a material fact, which mislead, will void an insurance contract, just as in any other contractual relationship, regardless of whether the misrepresentation was innocently made or made with fraudulent intent. Ruhlig v. American Community Mut. Ins. Co., 696 N.E.2d 877, 880 (Ind. Ct. App. 1998) citing Watson v. Golden Rule Ins. Co., 564 N.E.2d 302, 304 (Ind. Ct. App. 1990); American Family Mut. Ins. Co. v. Kivela, 408 N.E.2d 805, 810 (Ind. Ct. App. 1980); Bennett v. CrownLife Ins. Co., 776 N.E.2d 1264 (Ind. Ct. App. 2002); Jesse v. American Community Mut. Ins. Co., 725 N.E.2d 420 (Ind. Ct. App. 2000).
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