Articles Tagged with “Eli Lilly”

Earlier this month, Judge Richard Posner abruptly announced his retirement from the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit after more than 35 years on the bench, effective the following day. Judge Posner, a prolific writer and author of more than 3300 judicial opinions and nearly 40 books, was one of the most prominent appellate judges in the United States and the most-cited legal scholar of the 20th century, according to a survey by the Journal of Legal Studies. He carefully drafted his legal opinions to be easy to read and understand, and his signature concise, frank, and often humorous writing style helped to modernize the discipline of legal writing, presenting a stark contrast from the overly formal, long-winded “legalese” that had long dominated the legal field.

Just over three months prior to his retirement, Judge Posner authored an opinionKennedy v. The Lilly Extended Disability Plan, 856 F.3d 1136 (7th Cir. 2017), awarding substantial long term disability benefits to Cathleen Kennedy, an O’Ryan Law Firm client who had been forced to stop working in her position as an HR executive for Eli Lilly & Company as a result of severe fibromyalgia, a nightmarish condition characterized by chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain and fatigue that often presents with psychosomatic symptoms such as sleep and memory issues, anxiety, and depression. Unfortunately, because many of the primary symptoms of fibromyalgia – especially pain and fatigue – are difficult to objectively measure, the condition has historically been misunderstood and often goes undiagnosed due to the lack of a reliable means of testing for it. As a result, those who suffer from fibromyalgia also frequently must deal with the frustration caused by doubts about the validity of their condition and symptoms by friends, family, and sometimes even their healthcare providers.

Fortunately, recent scientific advances in the understanding of fibromyalgia have led to increasing acceptance of the validity of the condition and its profound impact on the lives of those who suffer from it. Judge Posner recognized this in his opinion, noting that Lilly itself markets a treatment for fibromyalgia and has been advised by one of its own physicians that fibromyalgia “is not only very common but is typically also very disabling” and that many victims of fibromyalgia “end up needing to stop working because of this condition.” Nonetheless, Lilly had terminated Ms. Kennedy’s long term disability benefits after she had been disabled for nearly four years due to fibromyalgia, despite the fact that her primary treating physicians had declared her to be permanently disabled, largely because there was no objective laboratory data proving the validity of her symptoms. Lilly claimed that although Ms. Kennedy was unable to work full time in her previous executive-level position, she could still work part time in one of “various non-executive positions” in her field.

As one of the largest employers in Indiana, Eli Lilly covers thousands of employees under their Extended Disability Plan (“Lilly EDL Plan”). The Lilly EDL Plan is self-insured, a rarity in the long term disability world. Just a few years ago, Anthem was the claims administrator for the Lilly EDL Plan but in the spring of 2012, Lilly hired Sedgwick to administer extended disability claims under the EDL Plan. Shortly after this time, our office began receiving calls from Lilly employees whose EDL benefits had been terminated or were under investigation by Sedgwick.

One of the calls we received was from the former Executive Director of Human Resources at Lilly who had worked for Lilly for over 25 years. Unfortunately, her diagnosis of Fibromyalgia worsened over the years until she was forced to leave Lilly and apply for short and long term disability benefits in December 2007. Fibromyalgia is a disease the Seventh Circuit has characterized as “common, but elusive and mysterious.” Sarchet v. Charter, 78 F.3d 305, 306 (7th Cir. 1996). In evaluating fibromyalgia in the context of a disability claim, the court in Sarchet described the disease as:

Its cause or causes are unknown, there is no cure, and, of greatest importance to disability law, its symptoms are entirely subjective. There are no laboratory tests for the presence or severity of fibromyalgia. The principal symptoms are “pain all over,” fatigue, disturbed sleep, stiffness, and–the only symptom that discriminates between it and other diseases of a rheumatic character–multiple tender spots, more precisely 18 fixed locations on the body (and the rule of thumb is that the patient must have at least 11 of them to be diagnosed as having fibromyalgia) that when pressed firmly cause the patient to flinch.

Based on the severity of her fibromyalgia condition, our client was approved for EDL benefits in May 2009 and she received those benefits for over 3½ until Sedgwick abruptly terminated those benefits.
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