Articles Tagged with cancer

A diagnosis of cancer – even one that is treatable – cannot be taken lightly. Although significant progress has been made in the field of cancer research and treatment, cancer still takes the lives of millions of people worldwide every year. There are over 100 types of cancer and treatment can vary for individuals on a case-by-case basis. Often, cancer and the treatment of cancer (which may include surgery, chemotherapy, and/or radiation) can force individuals to stop working.

Some may assume that a cancer patient who applies for disability benefits will easily be approved for disability benefits. However, this is not always true. It is not enough to prove a diagnosis of cancer and expect to receive disability benefits. Rather, the individual must show that the cancer and/or cancer treatment is causing severe symptoms that would prevent the performance of work and that they meet the applicable definition of “Disability”.

To improve the chances of being approved for disability benefits, the patient should have their doctor clearly document all of their symptoms, including pain, headaches, fatigue, nausea, numbness, dizziness, inability to concentrate, memory problems, difficulty walking or standing, emotional difficulty, and any other symptoms that affect functioning. This means that the patient must maintain treatment for all medical professionals they see, including oncologists, surgeons, family doctors, pain management specialists, and others.

The individual should also carefully track the symptoms they experience after surgery, chemotherapy, or radiation. Each of these forms of treatment may come with severe side effects. For example, chemotherapy may cause peripheral neuropathy. If a chemotherapy patient experiences neuropathy, they should have their doctor carefully document their symptoms of pain and numbness, and also undergo appropriate testing (EMG) to prove that the patient is experiencing neuropathy. Another possible side effect of chemotherapy is “chemo brain”. If an individual experiences chemo brain, they should undergo a mental status examination to document their forgetfulness, trouble concentrating, trouble multi-tasking, taking longer to finish tasks, or other memory problems.

Radiation affects people differently, but it may cause skin changes, tiredness, diarrhea, or trouble eating, among other side effects. Again, it is important to have medical providers document each and every symptom experienced. If a disability claim is missing documentation about each symptom, then it may not accurately depict the severity of the individual’s condition.
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