Articles Posted in Prudential

O’Ryan Law Firm, on behalf of Plaintiff Shane C., recently filed a federal lawsuit against The Prudential Insurance Company of America (“Prudential”). The Plaintiff was employed as Senior Vice President Regional Manager with Custard Insurance Adjusters, Inc. which made him eligible for disability benefits under the Custard Insurance Adjusters, Inc. Long Term Disability Plan (the “Plan”).  As a Regional Manager, Shane was required to travel to 9 different offices throughout the Midwest to oversee and supervise these 9 offices.

In Shane C. v. The Prudential Insurance Company of America and Custard Insurance Adjuster, Inc. Long Term Disability Plan, the Plaintiff filed a lawsuit under ERISA to gain the long-term disability benefits he was entitled to under the terms of the Prudential policy.

Facts of the Case Against Prudential

At the O’Ryan Law Firm, we have represented several clients who have become disabled due to the severe symptoms of Scleroderma.

According to the American College of Rheumatology:

WHAT IS SCLERODERMA?

Many of our clients suffer from depression as a result of their disabling physical conditions or they may have other disabling psychiatric conditions such as bipolar disorder. It is important to be aware that most disability policies cut-off disability benefits after 24 months of benefits if the disabling medical condition is considered a psychiatric condition otherwise known as a “mental impairment.” Each policy contains different language on this issue. For instance, the Prudential policy provides

What Disabilities Have a Limited Pay period Under Your Plan?

Disabilities which, as determined by Prudential, are due in whole or part to Mental illness also have a limited pay period during your lifetime.

The limited pay period for self-reported symptoms and mental illness combined is 24 months during your lifetime.

Mental illness means a psychiatric or psychological condition regardless of cause. Mental illness includes but is not limited to schizophrenia, depression, manic depressive or bipolar illness, anxiety, somatization, substance related disorders and/or adjustment disorders or other conditions. These conditions are usually treated by a mental health provider…using psychotherapy or psychotropic drugs.

In the case of Deal v. Prudential:

 Deal saw a host of medical professionals for both physical and psychological conditions out of a knee injury and associated pain.
 Diagnosed with Moderate Major Depressive Order  Two psychologists reports indicating Deal’s disability caused, at least in part, by mental disorders  The Court concluded–“Prudential has not shown that the mental disorder benefit limitation applies.”
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At the O’Ryan Law Firm, we have represented several individuals in disability claims who suffer from a disabling disease called Scleroderma. According to the American College of Rheumatology:

WHAT IS SCLERODERMA?
Scleroderma (also known as systemic sclerosis) is a chronic disease that causes the skin to become thick and hard; a buildup of scar tissue; and damage to internal organs such as the heart and blood vessels, lungs, stomach and kidneys. The effects of scleroderma vary widely and range from minor to life-threatening, depending on how widespread the disease is and which parts of the body are affected.
The two main types of scleroderma are:

• Localized scleroderma, which usually affects only the skin, although it can spread to the muscles, joints and bones. It does not affect other organs. Symptoms include discolored patches on the skin (a condition called morphea); or streaks or bands of thick, hard skin on the arms and legs (called linear scleroderma). When linear scleroderma occurs on the face and forehead, it is called en coup de sabre.

• Systemic scleroderma, which is the most serious form of the disease, affects the skin, muscles, joints, blood vessels, lungs, kidneys, heart and other organs.

HOW IS SCLERODERMA DIAGNOSED?
Diagnosis can be tricky because symptoms may be similar to those of other diseases. There is no one blood test or X-ray that can say for sure that you have scleroderma.
To make a diagnosis, a doctor will ask about the patient’s medical history, do a physical exam and possibly order lab tests and X-rays. Some symptoms he or she will look for include:

• Raynaud’s phenomenon. This term refers to color changes (blue, white and red) that occur in fingers (and sometimes toes), often after exposure to cold temperatures. It occurs when blood flow to the hands and fingers is temporarily reduced. This is one of the earliest signs of the disease; more than 90 percent of patients with scleroderma have Raynaud’s. Raynaud’s can lead to finger swelling, color changes, numbness, pain, skin ulcers and gangrene on the fingers and toes. People with other diseases can also have Raynaud’s and some people with Raynaud’s do not have any other disease.

• Skin thickening, swelling and tightening. This is the problem that leads to the name “scleroderma” (“Sclera” means hard and “derma” means skin). The skin may also become glossy or unusually dark or light in places. The disease can sometimes result in changes is personal appearance, especially in the face. When the skin becomes extremely tight, the function of the area affected can be reduced (for example, fingers).

• Enlarged red blood vessels on the hands, face and around nail beds (called “telangiectasias”).

• Calcium deposits in the skin or other areas.

• High blood pressure from kidney problems.

• Heartburn; this is an extremely common problem in scleroderma.

• Other problems of the digestive tract such as difficulty swallowing food, bloating and constipation, or problems absorbing food leading to weight loss.

• Shortness of breath.

• Joint pain.

HOW IS SCLERODERMA TREATED?
While some treatments are effective in treating some aspects of this disease, there is no drug that has been clearly proven to stop, or reverse, the key symptom of skin thickening and hardening. Medications that have proven helpful in treating other autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus, usually don’t work for people with scleroderma. Doctors aim to curb individual symptoms and prevent further complications with a combination of drugs and self-care.
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The Prudential Friendly Society was founded by insurance agent John Fairfield Dryden in a basement office in downtown Newark, N.J., in 1875. It was the first company in the U.S. to make life insurance available to the working class. In business for 137 years, it boast 48,000 employees worldwide.

At the O’Ryan Law Firm, we receive numerous calls a year from individuals who have become disabled, have disability coverage through Prudential, their doctor has reported to Prudential that they cannot work and Prudential denies the claim. One of Prudential’s favorite reasons for denying claims is what they call a lack of “objective medical evidence.” Many conditions, such as fibromyalgia or migraine headaches, result in symptoms, such as pain and fatigue, which are hard to prove objectively. There are no lab tests or diagnostic testing that are able to establish the severity of chronic pain or fatigue. Yet Prudential in these types of claims will insist on objective medical evidence to prove the disability thus making it nearly impossible to get the claim approved.

The courts have made clear in numerous cases that an insurer’s refusal to honor a claim for lack of scientific data such as lab tests and x-rays is an abuse of discretion where no such data exists in medicine for the conditions at issue and where licensed physicians have provided professional opinions that the conditions are genuine and credibly disabling the claimant. See Holmstrom v. Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, 615 F.3d 758, 769-772 (7th Cir. 2010); Leger v. Tribune Company Long Term Disability Benefit Plan, 557, F.3d 823, 834-835 (7th Cir. 2009); Hawkins v. First Union Corporation Long-Term Disability Plan, 326 F.3d 914, 919 (7th Cir. 2003).

In Holmstrom, the claimant suffered from Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (“CPRS”), a condition recognized by the medical community but for which there is no specific diagnostic test. 615 F.3d 758, 768. In that case, the plan acknowledged “Holmstrom’s claims of intractable pain, significant physical limitations, and cognitive deficiency as identified by [claimant and her treating physician],” but found “that the lack of objective findings to support ongoing total disability prevented [the plan] from determining whether [claimant’s] disability was genuine.” Id. at 764. In finding the Holmstrom plan’s denial arbitrary and capricious, the court stated that the plan “gave undue weight to the absence of objective measurements for [claimant’s] impairments,” reasoning that:

Subjectively painful conditions like CPRS and fibromyalgia pose difficult problems for private disability insurance plan administrators and the Social Security Administration, who understandably seek to make decisions based on the most objective evidence available. But we have rejected as arbitrary an administrator’s requirement that a claimant prove her condition with objective data where no definitive objective tests exist for the condition or its severity.
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